Martes, 18 Junio 2019
Colin O’Brady logró caminar más de 999 millas sin compañía. En su última etapa logró recorrer más de 125 kilómetros en 32 horas, sin parar.
colinobrady                                                                                                                                                    Foto: Youtube - Colin O'Brady


Casi 1.600 kilómetros en 54 días, solo y sin asistencia: un estadounidense que atravesó la Antártida de norte a sur a pie en solitario se convirtió esta semana en la primera persona en realizar una expedición de ese tipo.

"Logré mi objetivo: convertirme en la primera persona en la historia en cruzar el continente antártico de costa a costa, solo, sin ayuda", escribió Colin O'Brady, un extriatleta profesional de 33 años, en su cuenta de Instagram.

Para sumar épica a esta proeza, O'Brady cubrió los últimos 125 kilómetros en 32 horas tras decidir hacer la última etapa, sin descansar.

"Mientras hervía agua para prepararme el desayuno, una pregunta aparentemente imposible surgió en mi mente", escribió O'Brady en Instagram. "Me pregunté: ¿Será posible hacer el camino que me queda hasta la meta de un solo intento?".

"Para cuando me estaba atando las botas, el plan imposible se había convertido en un objetivo consolidado", dijo.

Su posición, definida por un GPS, era indicada cada día en su sitio web colinobrady.com. Hay que recordar que en 2016 un oficial del ejército inglés, el teniente coronel Henry Worsley, había intentado realizar la misma proeza, pero murió cuando buscaba terminar sin asistencia la travesía.
 
 
 
 
 
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Day 54: FINISH LINE!!! I did it! The Impossible First ✅. 32 hours and 30 minutes after leaving my last camp early Christmas morning, I covered the remaining ~80 miles in one continuous “Antarctica Ultramarathon” push to the finish line. The wooden post in the background of this picture marks the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf, where Antarctica’s land mass ends and the sea ice begins. As I pulled my sled over this invisible line, I accomplished my goal: to become the first person in history to traverse the continent of Antarctica coast to coast solo, unsupported and unaided. While the last 32 hours were some of the most challenging hours of my life, they have quite honestly been some of the best moments I have ever experienced. I was locked in a deep flow state the entire time, equally focused on the end goal, while allowing my mind to recount the profound lessons of this journey. I’m delirious writing this as I haven’t slept yet. There is so much to process and integrate and there will be many more posts to acknowledge the incredible group of people who supported this project. But for now, I want to simply recognize my #1 who I, of course, called immediately upon finishing. I burst into tears making this call. I was never alone out there. @jennabesaw you walked every step with me and guided me with your courage and strength. WE DID IT!! We turned our dream into reality and proved that The Impossible First is indeed possible. “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” - Nelson Mandela. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

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Day 53: THE BIG PUSH: ANTARCTICA ULTRAMARATHON. I woke up this morning about 80 miles away from the finish line. As I was boiling water for my morning oatmeal, a seemingly impossible question popped into my head. I wonder, would be possible to do one straight continuous push all the way to the end? By the time I was lacing up my boots the impossible plan had become a solidified goal. I’m going to go for it. I can feel it in my body that I am in the zone and want to harness that. It’s a rare and precious feeling to find the flow. I’m going to push on and try to finish all 80 miles to the end in one go. Currently, I am 18 hours and 48 miles into the push. I’m taking a pit stop now to melt more water before I continue on. I’m listening to my body and taking care of the details to keep myself safe. I called home and talked to my mom, sister and wife - I promised them I will stop when I need to. Only 35 more miles to make The Impossible First POSSIBLE. A very merry Christmas to all. Stay tuned... #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

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Day 47: THIS TOO SHALL PASS. After having my best day of the expedition yesterday, I nearly had my worst day today. I went to battle hard with my personal demons today. My anxiety started building last night after listening to a huge wind storm grow outside. The rattling of my tent kept me up and I began to get more and more nervous knowing I had to go out in it. I did my usual morning routine and then stepped into the madness. As expected, it was brutal. Blowing snow, sub zero temps and zero visibility. I packed off and headed out into the whiteout. I just entered a part of the route known as “Sastrugui National Park” aptly named for having the biggest sastrugui on the route. Pretty much the worse place to find yourself not being able to see where you are going. Due to the massive sastrugi, it’s also the one stretch where no plane can land so you are in dire straights if an emergency occurs. That really started playing on my mind after I fell hard 5 times in the first hour. What if I broke a bone or a ski? Maybe I should stop? I bargained with myself and finally decided I had to set my tent back up, less than two hours into the day. I told myself in my tent if I wanted to keep going that I could put on my long skins for better grip on the uneven surface and then continue. But I knew the effort it would take to put up the tent in a storm, it’s unlikely I was going any further. I fought to get the tent up, got inside with my skis, skins and stove, and put on my long skins. It was now decision time. Go back out? The voice in my head told me to stop, wait out the storm, rest. But the other voice told me I needed to keep moving forward or I’ll run out of food. My mind was ripping me apart. I closed my eyes and decided to meditate for a couple minutes repeating my favorite mantra: “This too shall pass.” One way or another I’d find my way out of this. Calmed and with renewed resolve I got back outside, fought to get my tent down and packed and continued onward. The storm outside never got any better, in fact it got progressively worse. However I managed to calm the storm in my mind and knock out 21.5 miles today. A great day all things considered.

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Day 48: BATTLING. I’m locked in a fierce battle with Antarctica at the moment. The storm from yesterday strengthened today blowing consistently 35mph, with gusts over 55mph. I got blown over on to the ground at least 20 times today. No doubt I’ll have some bruises in the morning. I did my best to scratch out another 20 miles, but it was hard won and has left me feeling emotionally and physically exhausted. I feel as though even as I get closer to the finish Antarctica wants to make sure I am fully tested if I want to realize my dream. One of my dearest friends and closest confidants @theblakebrinker sent me a paraphrase from one of my favorite books The Alchemist. These words were exactly what I needed to hear as I recover from today and prepare to battle another day with this storm and my soul tomorrow. “On your quest to become one with your personal legend before all is said and done you will be tested with all the lessons and conditions you have learned and endured from beginning until now. Know that is true and be at peace.” #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

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Day 38: THE NEXT GENERATION. I am humbled and proud that 30,000 school kids on six continents are now engaged with The Impossible First project as part of a collaboration with my non-profit Beyond 7/2 and @daciapjones who is one of the most amazing educators in America. Teachers have developed curriculum around my expedition and students are integrating data from my journey to learn about the science of weather, climate, math, history, geography, fitness, health etc. One of my greatest joys is sharing my expeditions with the next generation in hopes of inspiring them to set goals, live active and healthy lives and pursue their biggest dreams. Hopefully this project shows the importance of protecting our planet and that nothing is impossible when you set your mind to it. Really looking forward to doing in school visits again when I’m back home! Today, I had another parahelion (circle rainbow) glistening overhead. It was stunning. I’ve only ever seen this phenemnon in Antarctica and I’m curious why it happens. Perhaps one of the students can look it up and let me know? Less than 20 miles to the South Pole now!! #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

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